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Common Wire Loop Problems and Their Solutions

This page lists some problems and their solutions when making a wire loop.

Making the perfect loop takes practice. If you don't have the perfect loop quite yet, here are some common misloops and pointers on fixing them.

Teardrop loops

Teardrop loops are made by grasping the not-quite-end of the wire before begining to loop. By not starting at the very tip of the wire, the wire remains flat for a small length. This causes the loop to form a teardrop.

Solution:

Grasp the wire at the very tip before starting to loop.

 
P loops

P loops are made when the initial 90° bend in the wire is not made, or is not made sharply enough.

Solution:

Make a sharp 90° bend about 1/2" (12 mm) from the wire's end before starting to loop.

 
Bent loops

Bent loops are created when the loops are too small for the length of wire in the initial bend.

Solutions:

You can either:

  1. Bend less than 1/2" of the wire before starting the loop.

    or

  2. Loop the wire around a bigger section of the pliers to make a bigger loop.
 
Overwound (split ring) loops

An overwound wire loop looks like a split ring at the end of a wire. They are formed by correctly looping the wire, but having too much wire to loop, so that the extra overwinds into the loop.

Solutions:

You can either:

  1. Bend less than 1/2" of the wire before starting the loop. loop.

    or

  2. Loop the wire around a bigger section of the pliers to make a bigger loop.
 
Egg loops

Egg loops are made by winding the wire around different places on the pliers. As the radius of the pliers varies, the size of the loop changes, making an egg shape.

Solution:

When looping the wire, be careful to wrap around the same place on the pliers. You can mark your pliers with a permanent marker to use as a guide.

Also, be sure to release and rotate the pliers in quarter to half turns, instead of wrapping the wire around the pliers. This will allow you to loop consistantly.

 

Previous Technique << How to Make a Wire Loop

Next Technique >> How to Wire Wrap a Loop



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